SAINT JAMES U22417

Schooner X

  • Schooner
  • 165ffw 53m
  • 118ft Length
  • Long Point, Lake Erie
  • 42 27.104 80 07.331

Selection of News Articles for more www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca #

VESSELS FOUNDERED AND PROBABLE LOSS OF LIFE #

Saint James, Beaver Island,

Dec. 12th, 1855.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE FREE PRESS:

Mr. Geo. Brownson, who lives at the southwest extremity of this island, reports that last Wednesday there came ashore near his place numerous broken goods boxes and barrels, such as usually contain sugar, &c., addressed to some persons (names not remembered) in Chicago; several casks damaged powder, some fifty broken cheese boxes, and a few yet containing “Hamburg cheese;” also, the cabin (all above deck) of a small vessel, well made, and somewhat ornamented, matched, beaded and partially covered with oil-cloth, two windows, door with lock and white knobs. They must have belonged to a vessel lost at sea.

At the same place, two days later, some fifty pieces floor plank came on shore. It is supposed they were part of the deck-load of another vessel.

A considerable fleet (say twenty sail) passed here going up last Friday. The night following was a terrific south-east storm, with snow. It is not possible that they all weathered it, and the probability is that the loss of life and property is immense. Truly and sincerely,

JAMES J. STRANG

Dive Site review Erie East #

When she was found she was also shrouded in mystery.  No one knew her identity so she was called “Schooner X”.  Sitting with a slight list to port in 165 feet of water, she appeared to still be under way with her anchors in place, her masts rising eighty feet from the bottom of the lake, her wheel and cabins ready for action, and the silt forming waves around her hull.  She has a unique scrolled figurehead and both a wooden bilge pump and a newer cast iron bilge pump. Then, divers discovered her tonnage numbers carved in the main beam — 226 76/100.  Armed with this information, many measurements, and descriptions of equipment; marine historian Art Amos was able to identify her as the schooner, Saint James.
Saint James is commonly considered to be the best-preserved example of a 19th-century schooner anywhere in the Great Lakes.  It is an absolute must-dive for anyone with the proper training and equipment.

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